Monmouth County Family Law

Divorce Lawyers Assisting Residents of Monmouth County

Monmouth County is the fifth-most populous and northernmost county along the shore in New Jersey. Boating and fishing are popular activities. The county seat is Freehold. With a median household income of about $67,000, it ranks 38th in the nation for high-income households. Unfortunately, marriages sometimes end in divorce, which can result in complex proceedings and the need for a Monmouth County family law lawyer as sensitive issues are decided An experienced divorce attorney at Goldstein Law Group can make a difference in protecting the long-term interests of you and your children after your marriage is over.

Marital Estates, Alimony, and Child Support

Many families in Monmouth County are affluent and have complex marital estates involving intangible assets, assets that are not fully mature, and closely held businesses. Other types of property may include multiple homes, investment accounts, and retirement accounts. All marital property is divided equitably during a divorce, but separate property received by gift or through inheritance during the marriage remains separate property and is not divided, under most circumstances. What counts as marital property? Generally, anything that is construed as compensation for work done during the marriage will be part of the marital estate, including stock opinions, pension plans, and retirement accounts.

There are five types of alimony, both temporary and unlimited duration (we used to have “permanent alimony,” but recent legislation enacted in September 2014 effectively dispensed with such a type), that may be awarded in New Jersey, depending on the particular circumstances. The court will separate a consideration of alimony from a consideration of child support unless you can show why they should not be separated. Among other things, the court will examine health care payments, child care payments, and other child care expenses as part of a child support award. A family law attorney can help Monmouth County residents make sure that their needs are articulated.

As in other states, New Jersey courts apply a child support calculator. The formula considers the parents' combined gross income and how much time each parent spends with the child. Gross income includes not only the parents' wages, but also self-employment income, commissions, dividend income, rent, workers’ compensation, and unemployment insurance benefits. From this sum, the court deducts income taxes, mandatory payments such as certain union dues and mandatory retirement contributions, as well as other child support payments for other prior children with another spouse or partner. When one parent is taking care of young minor children, that parent is entitled to an additional contribution for child care expenses that are necessary for that parent to go to work.

Deviations from the formula are permitted in limited and compelling circumstances. Usually, the child support flows from the noncustodial parent (the parent of alternate residence; PAR) to whichever parent is considered the custodial parent (the parent of primary residence; PPR).

Discuss Your Matter with a Family Law Lawyer in Monmouth County

At Goldstein Law Group, our family law lawyers have strong ties to the Monmouth County community. Divorce and attendant issues such as how much certain assets are worth and with whom the children should live can bring out the worst in both spouses. We understand the stress that divorce can bring, and we can explain your alternatives when you are seeking a favorable outcome for you and your children. Our main office is located in Old Bridge, and we have a satellite office in Freehold, New Jersey. Our Monmouth County family law attorneys often represent individuals from Red Bank, Rumson, and East Brunswick. Contact us at 732-967-6777 or via our online form.

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